As I was researching for pages and websites concerning rebuilding art education,I found this wonderful Thesis. It’s an Art & Design Thesis written in 2009 titled “Building Art Education Relationships with Local Art Agencies” by Lori Beth Fulton.She did an educational study on building art education relationships between arteducatiors and local community art agencies in early February of 2009. It’s insanely interesting, I’ve only just begun to read it and here are some awesome snippets-

“National arts agencies such as the National Endowment for the Arts, Americans for the Arts, the Arts Education Partnership, and the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities conduct arts advocacy campaigns at the federal level most concerned with “arts learning experiences” (Gee, 2007) .   While promoting artistic experiences, they shift the focus from art educational experience and, consequently, the K-12 public school learning environment. These agencies, while energetically promoting their own arts agendas, do little or nothing to help the public’s perception of the necessity of funding arts education in the public educational system.  While successfully shaping the voice of arts education and public arts participation much of their campaigning and grant acquisition goes to support community venues for such efforts as afterschool and summer programs, local artists and art groups, artist-in-residency programs, and youth at risk.  The focus of many community art agency messages is on arts exposure experiences rather than advocating that K – 12 children have opportunities for in-depth study of the arts that a quality art education provides.”

“I also believe that the agendas of both art organizations and school based art education are valuable and important.  A powerful and influential national voice focused on promoting and advocating all arts experiences and education is needed.  The support of national agencies and organizations is necessary for promoting cultural awareness, thus generating value and benefits to all.  We also need state and local governments that understand, value, and support the need for arts education in our schools.  Public policies regarding the arts must be based on research and facts, not simply on supporting the agenda in which we have a vested interest.  We need to advocate art for its intrinsic value and what it brings to the table in education and society as a whole.”

“There seem to be both historical and traditional views of the arts that perpetuate myths 4 and misunderstandings about the value of a visual arts education.  Many decision-makers believe that because art cannot be measured quantitatively, it should not be considered a core subject.  Others believe that work done with the hands is anti-intellectual and therefore not as valued as more intellectual pursuits such as medicine or law.   Along with misconceptions about the arts, there seem to be multiple agendas and goals among arts advocacy organizations.  For example, the goals of the National Art Education Association, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Americans for the Arts are similar but have subtle and not-so-subtle differences.  A clear understanding of the functions and differences of these organizations could be beneficial to lobbying efforts and the networking potential for all arts advocacy groups. ”

The full .PDF is located at
http://digitalarchive.gsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1036&context=art_design_theses
It’s 70-74 pages I believe, but bookmark it to read off and on, it’s what I’m doing. Thosefirst few pages made me bookmark it right away.

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About thiskidanimation

I don't really know what to put here right now. I'm sure I'll think of something awesome.

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